Lots of Updates, Featuring Some (Surprise!) Book News & Giveaways Galore

Between working (on work) and hustling together some exciting book launch events (which are going to kick ass and I can’t wait to tell you about them), I’m not sleeping much these days. BUT. I’ve also been working on some kick-ass blog posts about beauty oils and body care routines!  In fact, I was hoping to post them this week, but my plans were foiled. They were foiled, however, for the very best reason, and that reason is that our Korean Beauty Secrets book started shipping 3 WEEKS EARLY!

Korean Beauty Secrets Book

It was insane, actually, as we had absolutely no idea that was going to happen!  We found out about it when people started messaging us on Sunday to tell us their book had just arrived from Amazon. First we did a lot of squealing, and after that we panicked. The original release date was supposed be November 3rd. Coco and I have been working on a companion website, the URL of which is actually in the back of the book. But that website isn’t ready yet because we thought we had a couple more weeks to work on it! So I’ve been in a frenzy since this past Sunday, frantically trying to get the book website ready for prime time. I haven’t showered in a couple of days, I’ve been subsisting on cereal and black cherry seltzer, and sleeping for 8 hours in a row is my new life goal.  This is how the hot dogs are made, you guys!

Korean Beauty Secrets Book

But the good news is: books are shipping! And I finally got a couple of copies of it today, and they look really, really good! Not only is the content great, the actual production is amazing. The binding, the weight, the print quality are all absolutely gorgeous; better than we ever imagined it would be. I’m so proud of this book that I have to restrain myself from shoving it in people’s faces and saying, “Have you seen this? I wrote it. Look at it. I SAID LOOK AT IT!”

Korean Beauty Secrets Book

Korean Beauty Secrets Book

Book-Related Instagram Giveaways

We’ve got a couple of pretty exciting Instagram giveaways surrounding this book going on right now! Here are the details for both:

Giveaway #1

Club Clio USA Book Launch Countdown Instagram Giveaway Event

Club Clio has been awesomely supportive of this book launch. They are doing a whole series of giveaways leading up to November 3rd (the original book launch date), with different bloggers getting to choose the giveaway prize. Today marks the start of my Clio giveaway, and the prize I’m choosing to bestow the winner is: Goodal Repair Plus Essential Oil! This is a moisturizing oil blend with fermented rice yeast, so it combines a few of my favorite things: fermentation, beauty oils, and Goodal. It’s rich but light, and perfect now that cooler, fall weather is setting in.

Goodal Repair Plus Essential Oil
This giveaway is open to US and Canadian residents. Entry is easy! Just complete the following 3 steps:

Step 1: Post or regram the giveaway post from my Instagram account (@skinandtonics), with hashtags #beautywolfxclubcliousa #kerryxcoco #koreanbeautysecretsbook #clubcliousa #clio10dayskbeauty
Step 2:  Follow us on Instagram: Coco is @thebeautywolf, I’m @skinandtonics, and Club Clio USA is @clubcliousa
Step 3: Tag three friends you think might enjoy this giveaway

You can enter once a day, just tag three different friends each day!

Giveaway #2

Kerry & Coco’s “Show us Your Book” Mega-Hardcore-Balls-Out K-Beauty Giveaway

Okay, you got me, I actually just made the name up for this giveaway just now. It could be a little tighter! We thought we had a couple more weeks to think of a name! Luckily, we already had the prize all ready to go. Hold on to your hats:

Show us Your Book Giveaway Price Package

One lucky winner will get an insane prize package that includes the following full size products:

• Acwell Bubble Free pH Balancing Cleanser (a recent favorite, review forthcoming)
• S:um37 Miracle Rose Cleansing Stick
• Leejiham (LJH) Cosmetics Tea Tree 90 Essence
• Leejiham (LJH) Cosmetics Vita Propolis Ampoule
• Graymelin Hyaluronic Acid 100% (Serum)
• Illi Total Aging Care Body Oil (This oil changed my life)
• I’m Lip Liquid by XO Memebox in color OR601
• I’m Lip Liquid by XO Memebox in color VL600

and the follow deluxe sample/travel-size products:

• Illi Total Aging Care Body Oil
• Illi Total Aging Care Body Lotion
• Goodal Moisture Barrier Cream
• Whamisa Organic Flowers Deep Rich Essence Toner
• Whamisa Organic Flowers Cleansing Oil

This prize is serious. We did not want to mess around, and we hope you’re as excited about it as we are!

How to Enter:

It’s super easy! All you have to do is post a picture on your Instagram of an in-person copy (preferably your personal copy) of Korean Beauty Secrets: A Practical Guide to Cutting-Edge Skincare & Makeup. You can style the photo however you want, but it has to be a picture of the physical book or e-book (as opposed to a picture you found on the internet). For e-books, just show us a shot of the book on your e-reader! Then follow and tag @kerryandcoco, @thebeautywolf, and @skinandtonics, and add hashtag #showusyourbook.

Once you’ve done that, voila! You’re entered! We’ll be choosing a winner at random on November 15, 2015 and announcing on Instagram, Twitter, and Facebook. This giveaway is open internationally!

If you haven’t ordered your copy yet, now is a great time to do it. It looks like it’s only ~$14 on Amazon right now, which is a fantastic deal. It will also be available from a huge number of other retailers in the U.S. and internationally on November 3rd; Amazon just happens to be the only one I know is already shipping right now.

It’s an amazing book; we’re really proud of it, and we can’t wait for all of you to read it and tell us what you think!

The post Lots of Updates, Featuring Some (Surprise!) Book News & Giveaways Galore appeared first on Skin & Tonics : Skincare Guides & Product Reviews.

Read More

Lots of Updates, Featuring Some (Surprise!) Book News & Giveaways Galore

Between working (on work) and hustling together some exciting book launch events (which are going to kick ass and I can’t wait to tell you about them), I’m not sleeping much these days. BUT. I’ve also been working on some kick-ass blog posts about beauty oils and body care routines!  In fact, I was hoping to post them this week, but my plans were foiled. They were foiled, however, for the very best reason, and that reason is that our Korean Beauty Secrets book started shipping 3 WEEKS EARLY!

Korean Beauty Secrets Book

It was insane, actually, as we had absolutely no idea that was going to happen!  We found out about it when people started messaging us on Sunday to tell us their book had just arrived from Amazon. First we did a lot of squealing, and after that we panicked. The original release date was supposed be November 3rd. Coco and I have been working on a companion website, the URL of which is actually in the back of the book. But that website isn’t ready yet because we thought we had a couple more weeks to work on it! So I’ve been in a frenzy since this past Sunday, frantically trying to get the book website ready for prime time. I haven’t showered in a couple of days, I’ve been subsisting on cereal and black cherry seltzer, and sleeping for 8 hours in a row is my new life goal.  This is how the hot dogs are made, you guys!

Korean Beauty Secrets Book

But the good news is: books are shipping! And I finally got a couple of copies of it today, and they look really, really good! Not only is the content great, the actual production is amazing. The binding, the weight, the print quality are all absolutely gorgeous; better than we ever imagined it would be. I’m so proud of this book that I have to restrain myself from shoving it in people’s faces and saying, “Have you seen this? I wrote it. Look at it. I SAID LOOK AT IT!”

Korean Beauty Secrets Book

Korean Beauty Secrets Book

Book-Related Instagram Giveaways

We’ve got a couple of pretty exciting Instagram giveaways surrounding this book going on right now! Here are the details for both:

Giveaway #1

Club Clio USA Book Launch Countdown Instagram Giveaway Event

Club Clio has been awesomely supportive of this book launch. They are doing a whole series of giveaways leading up to November 3rd (the original book launch date), with different bloggers getting to choose the giveaway prize. Today marks the start of my Clio giveaway, and the prize I’m choosing to bestow the winner is: Goodal Repair Plus Essential Oil! This is a moisturizing oil blend with fermented rice yeast, so it combines a few of my favorite things: fermentation, beauty oils, and Goodal. It’s rich but light, and perfect now that cooler, fall weather is setting in.

Goodal Repair Plus Essential Oil
This giveaway is open to US and Canadian residents. Entry is easy! Just complete the following 3 steps:

Step 1: Post or regram the giveaway post from my Instagram account (@skinandtonics), with hashtags #beautywolfxclubcliousa #kerryxcoco #koreanbeautysecretsbook #clubcliousa #clio10dayskbeauty
Step 2:  Follow us on Instagram: Coco is @thebeautywolf, I’m @skinandtonics, and Club Clio USA is @clubcliousa
Step 3: Tag three friends you think might enjoy this giveaway

You can enter once a day, just tag three different friends each day!

Giveaway #2

Kerry & Coco’s “Show us Your Book” Mega-Hardcore-Balls-Out K-Beauty Giveaway

Okay, you got me, I actually just made the name up for this giveaway just now. It could be a little tighter! We thought we had a couple more weeks to think of a name! Luckily, we already had the prize all ready to go. Hold on to your hats:

Show us Your Book Giveaway Price Package

One lucky winner will get an insane prize package that includes the following full size products:

• Acwell Bubble Free pH Balancing Cleanser (a recent favorite, review forthcoming)
• S:um37 Miracle Rose Cleansing Stick
• Leejiham (LJH) Cosmetics Tea Tree 90 Essence
• Leejiham (LJH) Cosmetics Vita Propolis Ampoule
• Graymelin Hyaluronic Acid 100% (Serum)
• Illi Total Aging Care Body Oil (This oil changed my life)
• I’m Lip Liquid by XO Memebox in color OR601
• I’m Lip Liquid by XO Memebox in color VL600

and the follow deluxe sample/travel-size products:

• Illi Total Aging Care Body Oil
• Illi Total Aging Care Body Lotion
• Goodal Moisture Barrier Cream
• Whamisa Organic Flowers Deep Rich Essence Toner
• Whamisa Organic Flowers Cleansing Oil

This prize is serious. We did not want to mess around, and we hope you’re as excited about it as we are!

How to Enter:

It’s super easy! All you have to do is post a picture on your Instagram of an in-person copy (preferably your personal copy) of Korean Beauty Secrets: A Practical Guide to Cutting-Edge Skincare & Makeup. You can style the photo however you want, but it has to be a picture of the physical book or e-book (as opposed to a picture you found on the internet). For e-books, just show us a shot of the book on your e-reader! Then follow and tag @kerryandcoco, @thebeautywolf, and @skinandtonics, and add hashtag #showusyourbook.

Once you’ve done that, voila! You’re entered! We’ll be choosing a winner at random on November 15, 2015 and announcing on Instagram, Twitter, and Facebook. This giveaway is open internationally!

If you haven’t ordered your copy yet, now is a great time to do it. It looks like it’s only ~$14 on Amazon right now, which is a fantastic deal. It will also be available from a huge number of other retailers in the U.S. and internationally on November 3rd; Amazon just happens to be the only one I know is already shipping right now.

It’s an amazing book; we’re really proud of it, and we can’t wait for all of you to read it and tell us what you think!

The post Lots of Updates, Featuring Some (Surprise!) Book News & Giveaways Galore appeared first on Skin & Tonics : Skincare Guides & Product Reviews.

Read More

The Beginner’s Guide To Retinol & Retinoids: How To Prevent Dry, Flaky Side-Effects

As a product formulator and practicing esthetician with over 30 years of experience, I consider myself well-versed in retinol and retinoids. Fun fact: I personally knew one of the dermatologists who was instrumental in getting this ingredient FDA approved as the first topical preventative aging product (read the full story of when I met this dermatologist. It’s a good one). So without further ado, keep reading to learn my expert tips for getting maximum benefits from a topical vitamin A product, whether it’s a prescription form (retinoid) or in an over-the-counter version (retinol).

First things first. In an ever-changing world of skincare advancements related to preventing and reversing the appearance of lines, wrinkles, indented acne scars, large pores, and brown spots, there are TWO facts that have remained constant for the past 30+ years.

  • Fact #1: Certain types of vitamin A, the ingredient behind retinol and prescription retinoids, can reverse visible signs of aging. Using a topical product containing these ingredients can increase cell thickness, affect gene expression, thin the stratum corneum, and increase the production of collagen. With continued use, vitamin A can slowly improve the skin’s appearance (NCBI Study). It smoothes skin texture by lessening visible wrinkles, lines, indented acne scars, large pores, and brown spots. Simply put, this ingredient can deliver smoothing and resurfacing results. Thus, it can help the skin mature in a more desirable way.
  • Fact #2: You must take special care of your skin to manage and prevent potential side effects such as dryness and irritation (especially if you’re using a prescription formula). In the early ’90s when tretinoin first became FDA-approved for treating sun damage, not much was known about controlling its side effects. If misused, the effects were often intolerable. I once had a client who was using a prescription retinoid improperly. She smiled, and in front of my very eyes, areas of her face cracked and started to bleed. I couldn’t believe what I was seeing! These days, the side effects of retinol and retinoids are completely manageable (NCBI Study). All you need to do is take special care of your skin by following my expert tips.

The Most Common Types of Vitamin A Ingredients

1. Retinoid (Tretinoin)

This ingredient is derived from vitamin A and is only available in prescription formulas (with the exception of Adapalene, or Differin, which is now sold without a prescription). When applied to the skin, it converts directly to retinoic acid. It then binds to cell receptors and activates the cell maturation process in the skin. Brand names include Retin A, Retin-A Micro, and Renova.

2. Retinol

This is an ingredient found in non-prescription formulas. When applied (assuming it’s an encapsulated, stable, and well-formulated product), it converts slowly to retinoic acid. It’s time-released, which means it’s delivered into the skin gradually, over a period of hours, instead of all at once like retinoids are. Because of this, retinol users often experience less irritation than retinoid users. Therefore, retinol is ideal for sensitive, reactive skin types, as well as those with less sun damage. Despite being a gentler option, retinol is still effective and can deliver the same results as a prescription with long-term use.

Note: Biochemically, retinoids and retinol perform the same function, which means you’ll get results regardless of which one you choose to use. Results may take a little longer to achieve with retinol-based products, but that’s exactly what is needed for vitamin A newbies and people with sensitive skin types.

3. Retinyl Palmitate

This is a storage form of vitamin A. It’s a blend of pure retinol and palmitic acid, and it’s much weaker than retinol. The process of retinyl palmitate converting to retinoic acid is considerably more complex, and the amount that ends up reaching the cellular receptor is very small. It simply cannot compare to the efficacy of pure retinol. When used in a formula, this ingredient can improve the chemical stability of retinol and act as an emollient and antioxidant, but you typically shouldn’t count on it to deliver the same smoothing and brightening results as retinol. Retinyl Acetate, Retinyl Linoleate, and Retinyl Propionate are in this same category.

4. Retinaldehyde

This is a stable precursor to retinoic acid. When it’s stable and encapsulated, it can convert slowly within the skin to retinoic acid just like retinol.

It’s important to note that just because a product contains one of the vitamin A ingredients listed above does NOT mean it will necessarily deliver results. You must consider how the formula is made, which percentage is used, how it’s delivered into the skin, and how stable it is. You’ll usually have to do a bit of research to find all of this out. If a brand is not readily sharing this information, I consider it a red flag, because it could be representative of the product’s lack of true efficacy. Any good formulator knows this is very important information to share with their customers; they should share their product stats proudly. (Read four things to look for when choosing a retinol product.)

How To Decide if You Should Use Retinol or Get a Prescription Retinoid From Your Doctor

I start all of my clients on retinol, regardless of how much sun damage they have. Here are some guidelines for making this decision for yourself.

 Start Using a Prescription Retinoid if You’re…

  • NOT sensitive at all. If you are sensitive, there’s no need to read this section, as a prescription retinoid is not best for you. (Most people have a certain degree of skin sensitivity, which is why I suggest using retinol first. If you fit the following conditions, though, you can eventually transition to using a prescription retinoid.)
  • Someone who’s over the age of 35 with a long history of sun damage. You may feel like your skin shows more visible signs of aging than other people your age.
  • Someone who, regardless of age, has pitted, indented acne scars from your younger years.
  • Someone who, regardless of age, has melasma from the sun, heat, pregnancy, or hormones. You’ll benefit from something stronger to work deeper and faster. Again though, if you have sensitive skin, it’s best to start with retinol.

Skip a Prescription Retinoid and Use Retinol if You’re….

  • Someone who, regardless of age, has thin, dry, and/or sensitive skin. This includes anyone who has rosacea, a history of eczema, or simply an easily-irritated skin type. These skin types may never adjust to a prescription retinoid due to the delicate protective barrier that’s easily compromised.
  • Someone under the age of 35 with no major acne issues who is already using vitamin A to prevent wrinkles, lighten discoloration, reduce pore size, and smooth skin texture. Sticking with retinol and occasional chemical peels is perfect because you’re already getting ahead of the aging process. There’s not as much repair and reversal work to be done in those younger than 35.

When to Start Using Retinol to Prevent Signs of Aging

Assuming that blemishes are not your main concern, I generally recommend starting to use retinol between the ages of 26 and 30. The exact age will depend on your specific skin type, although I don’t suggest starting it before 26. There are two reasons for this. The first is that many people who are younger than 26 are still dealing with breakouts. Despite what you may have heard, retinol or retinoids do NOT help cystic or pustular acne. However, prescription retinoids CAN be effective for managing closed comedones. I discuss this more in detail below.

The second reason is that vitamin A speeds up the skin’s metabolism, which begins to slow in your early 30s. When you’re younger, your skin is already very metabolically active. Using retinol or retinoids too early might backfire and stir up breakouts, rashes, and more. Basically, it could disrupt the skin’s natural balance.

What to Know Before Using Retinol or a Prescription Retinoid

Avoid Using Retinol or Prescription Retinoids While Pregnant

Of course, it’s always best to consult with your doctor. In my experience, though, most advise against using vitamin A until after giving birth due to potential risks. I have not personally come across any reported evidence of either topical retinol or retinoids causing harm, but doctors are extra cautious with expecting mothers, and understandably so.

Retinol Can Be Used During the Summer as Long as You’re Serious about Sun Protection

Retinol and retinoid products deliver the best results when used two to five nights a week year-round. Using it on and off can slow progress, so it’s important to commit to using it consistently, even during the summer months. As long as you’re someone who practices sun safety and is very conscientious about preventing suntans and sunburns, then you should be just fine.

However, if you are someone who enjoys tanning or someone who hasn’t yet mastered the art of sun protection, I would suggest discontinuing your retinol or retinoid seven days before intense outdoor sun exposure. Start it back up again a week after you’ve been in the sun—assuming you don’t have a sunburn, of course. While this will slow down results, it’s super important to prevent skin inflammation and irritation.

You’ll See Better and Faster Results If You Use Exfoliating Acids in Your Routine, Too

When dry, dead cells are regularly removed from the skin’s surface, vitamin A is more easily absorbed. You’ll definitely want to start using an exfoliating acid serum, but more on that later.

Retinol and Retinoids Don’t Deliver Visible Results Quickly, so You Must Be Patient

Unlike an exfoliating acid peel that delivers immediate results, vitamin A works incredibly slowly to create change in the skin. I generally tell my clients that they won’t start seeing improved textural changes for two to four months. With continued use, you’ll see more and more positive changes. Do not give up. Stick with it!

You’re Not Going to Get Anti-Acne Benefits With Retinol. You Might with a Prescription Retinoid, But Only For Certain Types of Breakouts

Yes, prescription retinoids like Retin-A were, in fact, originally developed in the ’70s for treating acne. It wasn’t actually discovered until later that the ingredient also helped with wrinkles. That explains why, for a long time, retinoids had the reputation of being a go-to for acne. The truth is, they’re not for everyone. All skin is different and so are the type of breakouts that each person experiences. (This explains why you may hear about a product working like magic for one person and then making another person’s breakouts worse!)

The type of acne prescription retinoids work best for is comedonal acne. This is the type that appears as whiteheads, blackheads, closed comedones, and clogged, non-inflamed bumps. Retinoids restore the organization of cells through cellular turnover. This, in turn, prevents cells from getting trapped and blocked in the pore-lining which in turn, prevents those little non-infected bumps from forming.

Prescription retinoids do not work well for sore, inflamed pustular acne or cysts. In fact, when someone has infected pustular and cystic acne, retinoids may actually make them worse. It’s far better to use products that have more proven breakout-fighting benefits, such as salicylic acid, tea tree, beta-glucan, niacinamide, manuka, sulfur, lactic acid, and benzoyl peroxide. (On that note, beware of skincare brands that claim their retinol product can treat acne AND wrinkles as a one-stop-shop. This is false and anyone sharing this is simply not informed of how retinol really works. Trust me on this!)

As for retinol, since it contains a lesser dose of vitamin A, it doesn’t work as hard as retinoids do to clear clogged bumps. If breakouts are your main concern, I usually advise focusing on clearing blemishes first. Once the skin is clear, you can start using a retinol product to prevent the visible signs of aging. However, there is now a 1% Differin (adapalene) gel retinoid formula available without a prescription. It’s worth adding to your routine to see if it alleviates breakouts.

One more note on retinol and breakouts—I suggest using an exfoliating acid serum that contains salicylic acid on nights you’re not using the retinol to increase vitamin A’s efficacy. I’ll discuss this more at length in a bit. I recommend the Renée Rouleau BHA Clarifying Serum to all of my clients, as well as the Zit Care Kit for making all kinds of blemishes disappear quickly.

It’s Best to Avoid Oil-Based Retinol Formulas If You’re Prone to Clogged Pores

Some retinol formulas are kept stable in a blend of pure oils. This gives them a somewhat greasy feel on the skin. While dry skin types can always benefit from oil saturation, oily and breakout-prone skin types should avoid these types of formulas. (After all, the underlying cause of blemishes is oil—oil breeds bacteria and bacteria lead to blemishes.) Choose your formulas wisely!

If You Have a History of Eczema, You Should Use Retinol—Not a Prescription Retinoid

Vitamin A is very active and breaks down the skin’s protective moisture barrier through its aggressive cellular turnover process (basically, it causes dryness). That explains why people who have eczema-prone skin find that retinoids can cause flare-ups. In this case, it’s best to only use retinol.

Even If You Only Apply a Prescription Retinoid to One Area of Your Face, It Can Affect Your Entire Face

Some people apply prescription retinoids strategically in an effort to target a specific area. For example, some people apply it only around their eye area. They think this will help eye-area wrinkles while sparing the rest of their face from dryness. In reality, the ingredient travels underneath the skin. Even if you apply a retinoid strategically, it will work everywhere, which means you can experience dryness everywhere.

A Step-By-Step Guide to Using Retinol

As I said before if you’re new to using vitamin A, I suggest starting with a non-prescription version such as retinol. To reiterate, the reason is that you want to introduce vitamin A slowly. Most people who start with a prescription (without proper usage instruction) eventually give up because their skin becomes too dry and irritated. If you have a prescription and haven’t been able to use it successfully, consider putting that on hold for now. Start with non-prescription retinol first to introduce it to your skin gradually. Advanced Resurfacing Serum is the retinol product that I personally use. It’s also the one I recommend to my clients. The formula is effective because it combines stable retinol AND skin-firming peptides that help prevent loss of tone.

1. Start by Using Your Retinol Product 2 Nights on, and 1 Night Off

Repeat this throughout the week. For best results, you must use retinol consistently (and often!). Your skin has other needs, though, so you don’t want to use it every single night. Plus, using it too often could prove too much for your skin, since it’s such a biologically active ingredient.

Following the two nights on, one night off rule will result in four nights a week. If you are over 40 with a history of sun damage and your skin isn’t overly sensitive, you can use it four to five nights a week. However, no one should use it for more than five nights a week. This can eventually result in increased sensitivity and a waxy and unnatural appearance.

On the other hand, if you’re under 40 and your skin is fairly sensitive, you might start by using it only twice a week. Then after two months, you can work up to using it three nights a week. Eventually, work up to four nights a week. When in doubt, start slow and increase as you go along. If you’re experiencing dryness or irritation, you’re either using too much or using it too often. This is a sure sign that you should cut back. Remember: using retinol or retinoids successfully is a marathon, not a sprint.

2. Avoid Applying Moisturizer Immediately After Applying Retinol

Using a cream or lotion right after applying retinol may dilute it slightly. It’s best to let it absorb for 20 minutes. Or, you can use a retinol serum that has a lotion-like texture. This can offer hydrating and protective benefits, thus skipping the need for moisturizer altogether.

3. Maximize Results and Minimize Potential Side-Effects By Using an Exfoliating Acid Serum on Opposite Nights

This is really important. Retinol works to encourage dull, sun-damaged skin cells to rise to the surface for easy removal. Using a gentle, alcohol-free exfoliating acid serum once or twice a week (such as one with glycolic, lactic, salicylic, or mandelic acid) will accelerate these cells’ removal. Vitamin A can then absorb deeper into the skin to perform its best. Using both will reveal a smoother, more even-toned texture.

A lot of people use exfoliating toners that contain acids. They often ask me where they should plug that into a retinol or retinoid routine. I never suggest that my clients exfoliate every day, so I don’t recommend using an acid-based toner every morning and night. This is regardless of whether or not you’re using any vitamin A products. If you want to use an exfoliating toner, I would suggest using it on the nights that you use the retinol or retinoid. It can act as a pre-treatment/primer to allow the vitamin A ingredient to absorb deeper into the skin.

Did you know that acids actually help correct dryness? When people experience surface dryness (due to age, drying products, airplane travel, etc), their first instinct is to apply face oil or a heavy moisturizer. This is helpful for pushing moisture into the top layers of the skin, but the dry, expired cells want to (and desperately need to) come off. Over-moisturizing may interfere with and slow down cell turnover. Regularly using exfoliating acids is like saying “out with the old and in with the new” to your skin. This is why top dermatologists and skincare professionals recommend acids so widely.

4. Once a Week, Skip the Exfoliating Acid or Retinol and Use a Hydrating Serum Containing Antioxidants, Epidermal Growth Factors, or Peptides

Your skin requires a variety of ingredients to age healthily. Therefore, you don’t want to constantly stay in exfoliation/cell turnover mode by only using acids and retinol. It’s just like your exercise routine. When working out, it’s best to alternate between various types of exercise, so you’re getting a little bit of everything. Your skin appreciates the same variety. The Renée Rouleau Firm + Repair Overnight Serum is the one I often suggest to my clients.

5. To Boost Results, Get a Professional Chemical Peel or Give Yourself One at Home

Once you’ve been on your new retinol routine for two months, it’s good to kick it up a notch. Try introducing your skin to a chemical peel—especially if you’re someone who has large pores, wrinkles, and discoloration from sun damage. A peel is essentially a stronger version of retinol. It’s intensifying your skin’s collagen-boosting activity to encourage faster smoothing results. Synergistically, they both support one another in the quest for smoother, more even-toned skin.

There are many types of peels, so you’ll want to consult with a trusted skincare professional to find out which type and what frequency is best for your skin. I generally recommend that clients get light to medium chemical peels (ones that make your skin shed for a few days after) six to eight times a year. You can get lighter peels every other month.

The Renée Rouleau Triple Berry Smoothing Peel is great to use three to four times a month. There are no harsh side effects, only beautiful results to increase the skin-smoothing benefits of retinol. You can also give yourself a DIY chemical peel at home if you happen to have a tube of a prescription retinoid lying around.

6. If You Think You Want to Start Using a Prescription Retinoid, Introduce It Slowly After 6 Months

Of course, you’ll have to consult with a doctor about this. There are so many different kinds, but your doctor can suggest what’s best for you and your specific skin goals. You should start with the lowest strength.

How to Introduce a Prescription Retinoid Into Your Routine

Weeks 1-4: Substitute Your Retinol Serum with a Prescription Retinoid One Night Per Week

After cleansing, immediately apply an alcohol-free toner. Leave it damp, then apply a thin layer of a lightweight moisturizer to the skin before applying your retinoid. The moisturizer cannot be heavy or greasy at all. Wait for five minutes and apply a pea-sized amount of the prescription to the entire face. (I recommend treating the neck and chest with retinoids, too. Use an extra pea-sized amount for this area as well.) Let dry for 20 minutes and follow with another application of moisturizer. This time, you can use your normal moisturizer. Ideally, use one that keeps the skin’s moisture barrier intact and sensitivity to a minimum. The Renée Rouleau Phytolipid Comfort Creme is a great option for new retinoid users.

Note: There has been much discussion in years past about whether or not using a moisturizer underneath vitamin A affects its performance. Most believe that it does not interfere with penetration. Instead, the right moisturizer can keep the moisture barrier intact to prevent dryness. This is truly the secret to making a prescription tolerable. I always recommend the Renée Rouleau Sheer Moisture Lotion to my clients due to its light texture and stable antioxidants. Retinoids can cause “micro wounding” in the skin, and antioxidants help stop the resulting inflammatory response. This makes Sheer Moisture a perfect companion to prescription formulas.

Weeks 4-10: Repeat the Above Process But Now Substitute Your Retinol Serum with a Prescription Retinoid Two Nights Per Week

Think of your prescription retinoid as a workout for your skin. You don’t want to lift the heaviest weights on day one. Instead, you want to take it slow and gradually build up to it over time.

Weeks 10+: Repeat the Above Process But Now Substitute Your Retinol Serum with a Prescription Retinoid Three Nights Per Week

For most people, I suggest sticking with this routine for the long run. You’ll alternate nights between your original retinol serum (eventually you can drop this), a retinoid, an exfoliating acid serum, and a hydrating serum. You’ll use your prescription retinoid three nights a week while giving your skin an amazing variety of other active ingredients. They’ll all work synergistically to improve the look of your brown spots, wrinkles, and large pores.

If you have very sun-damaged skin, you may want to increase the prescription retinoid to four nights a week after six months. Also, consider upgrading to a new one with a stronger percentage. I do, however, discourage people from getting too excited and using it too frequently. Over time, this can cause the skin to appear tight, shiny, and waxy, almost like a plastic Barbie doll. I can spot someone who is overusing prescription retinoids a mile away, and it’s not a great look. It just doesn’t look natural.

The Bottom Line

I’ve seen the results retinol and retinoids can provide on so many of my clients’ faces in the past 30 years of my career. While I’m super proud of the retinol formula I created, there are other great ones out there, too. You just have to do your due diligence since it’s a tricky ingredient with which to work, and not all formulators know how to make the best products.

I’ll leave you with one last thought. As I mentioned previously, using a retinol or retinoid is a marathon, not a sprint. It can take a while to see results, meaning you won’t get immediate gratification. To truly reap its benefits, without incurring dryness or irritation, deliver a slow drip of it to the skin. I recommend using it regularly for the rest of your life…or until a better anti-aging product takes its place! And if that’s the case, I’ll be sure to let you know. For now, head on down Retinol Road.

Next, find out how to adjust your skincare routine when using a prescription retinoid.

The post The Beginner’s Guide To Retinol & Retinoids: How To Prevent Dry, Flaky Side-Effects appeared first on Expert Skin Advice from Renee Rouleau.

Read More

Renée’s Talks Foot Care and How to Prevent Dry, Cracked Heels

For almost as long as I can remember, I’ve had an issue with dry, cracked heels. (I’m pretty sure I inherited them from my mom!) Because of this, I’ve always tried to be meticulous about a good foot-care routine. But a few years ago, I realized I was going about it all wrong.

The remedy for cracked heels used to be all about constantly trying to remove dry skin. I used to use something called a Credo blade, which I think is actually illegal in most states now (yikes!). It was literally a giant blade I would use to shave off my calluses and I would remove way too much skin and my feet got so sensitive it was hard to walk sometimes! Needless to say, it didn’t lead to the best results.

Thankfully, I’ve come a long way and have figured out how to keep my heels smooth and soft, all year round. Keep reading to learn my two main remedies for cracked heels plus a few more tips to keep your feet looking their best!

My Two Simple Tricks for Healing and Preventing Cracked Heels

I was getting a pedicure a few years back and offhandedly mentioned that my heels had been cracking so much lately, despite the fact that I had been regularly buffing them. “You should try wearing socks as often as you can,” the pedicurist replied. “It helps your feet hold on to moisture.”

Of course, the more I thought about it, the more it made sense. Feet don’t really have oil glands the way the skin on the rest of the body does, so it’s very difficult for them to hold moisture on their own. Wearing socks is kind of a similar concept to using a facial oil—you’re creating a barrier that allows a moist environment to exist underneath by making it harder for water to escape. 

First, I started wearing socks around the house as often as possible, and I definitely noticed a difference. Pro tip? Be sure to wear socks as much as you can during summer as well as winter. People usually associate dry, cracked heels with winter, which can definitely be the case, but I’ve found it’s actually worse for me in summer because I’m always barefoot or in sandals. Now I always wear socks when I’m not out and about. (I actually prefer men’s socks because they’re thicker and roomier, I just find them more comfortable.)

So, wearing socks helped, but because my heels had already been so dry and cracked to begin with, I needed to step it up a notch to actually repair them. I started slathering Aquaphor ointment before bed and sleeping in socks at least four nights a week. After six weeks, I was shocked at how much my feet were transformed. I now do this twice a week for maintenance and honestly, I barely have to buff my feet anymore because there is very little dead skin. What can I say, sometimes the simplest solutions are the best ones!

The Best Way to Remove Dry Skin From Your Feet

While keeping your feet consistently moisturized is arguably the most important aspect of a foot care routine, you still want to make sure you’re exfoliating once in a while to remove dry skin. After all, if you keep trying to moisturize dry, expired cells, you won’t get very far. 

Since the skin on the heels is so thick, I’ve found that scrubs really aren’t anywhere near strong enough. I do believe physical exfoliation (manually removing dead skin) is the best way to go, but it needs to be more of a buffing or sanding motion done with a tool. Personally, I like this traditional callus remover because it works well and is the one they use on me during pedicures. If you want something more gentle, this foot file gently rolls over the skin to buff off calluses. Either way, be sure to remove the skin after it’s been softened by a shower, bath, or foot soak.

Personally, I’m not a huge fan of exfoliating acids on the feet simply because they have to be very strong in order to work. I have tried acid products like Baby Foot, but I never found they made much of a difference when it came to my heels. That said, I know some people swear by it so if you’re interested, it’s worth a shot!

Try an Exfoliating Acid On Your Cuticles

I do love using an exfoliating acid, like my Smoothing Body Serum, on my cuticles once in a while. I apply a little on my toes then add moisturizer, and it keeps them looking fresh. It also prevents me from having to use cuticle nippers, which can leave your cuticle looking a little messy by causing ragged edges. 

Take a Break From Polish

My toenails are painted pretty much all summer long, so come winter I like to give them a bit of a break. By this point, my nails are pretty dry and have a bit of a white-ish tint to them. In addition to giving them a break from polish, I like to revitalize them by extending my Aquaphor onto the nails and massaging it in a little bit. I’ll top it off with an oil for extra nourishment (I like to use my own since it has a blend of 12 oils rich in vitamins and omega fatty acids that are perfect for replenishing brittle nails).

So there you have it, my straightforward guide to soft, smooth heels and feet! This is a great time of year to get a head start and have your feet in great condition once sandal season rolls around again.

Next, learn how to protect your hands from four main signs of aging.

The post Renée’s Talks Foot Care and How to Prevent Dry, Cracked Heels appeared first on Expert Skin Advice from Renee Rouleau.

Read More

Could Tap Water be Causing Your Dryness, Sensitivity, or Clogged Pores?

If you’ve ever wondered whether or not tap water is bad for your skin, you’re not alone. The answer isn’t as simple as “yes” or “no,” but depending on where you live, it can potentially lead to dryness, irritation, and even clogged pores.

I’ve seen firsthand how the quality of tap water can affect people’s skin. I had a client who reached out to me after moving to LA, telling me her rosacea was worse than ever and that she was suddenly experiencing an influx of clogged pores. She also mentioned feeling like there was a film or residue on her skin, saying it seemed like serums she’d once loved suddenly weren’t as effective. After asking some questions to see if anything else significant in her routine or lifestyle had changed, I determined it was probably the change in the tap water causing her skin issues. Sure enough, she told me that every time she went back home to Michigan, her skin would improve. It became softer and less irritated almost immediately, and the film on her skin seemed to disappear. 

In this post, I’ll explain what could’ve led to this, how and why tap water can affect your skin, and what you can do about it. Let’s dive in! 

What’s Actually in Our Tap Water, and Can It Cause Skin Problems?

For the sake of this post, I want to clarify that when I say “tap water,” I’ll be referring to municipal water. A majority of people in the U.S. have access to municipal water, which is provided by a city or town and has been treated to be more consumer-friendly. This could mean increasing or decreasing concentrations of certain minerals, adding fluorine, and “cleaning” the water to reduce harmful bacteria and other contaminants.

Minerals (Sodium, Calcium, and Magnesium)

When people talk about how tap water affects our skin, they usually focus on the minerals it contains. The three minerals you’re most likely to find in tap water are sodium, calcium, and magnesium. Additionally, copper, iron, potassium, and zinc might be found in trace amounts. 

It’s true that the minerals in tap water can lead to skin problems, but not for the reasons you might suspect. I spoke to Valerie George, a cosmetic chemist and friend of mine, to get the low-down. Valerie explained that the minerals themselves are fairly harmless (and can even be beneficial in some cases), but the real issue arises when minerals in tap water interact with the surfactants in our cleansers or bar soaps (which is one reason I don’t recommend washing your face with bar soap, btw). 

Surfactants are cleansing agents that attract dirt and oil, lifting them from the surface of our skin. Now, this is where it gets a little complicated. According to Valerie, many of the surfactants used in cleansers or soaps have a negative ionic charge. The minerals in our tap water, on the other hand, have a positive charge. This means they really want to bind to something negatively charged, making them very attracted to surfactants. Once the minerals attach to surfactants, they basically combine to create soap scum. I’m sure you’ve seen the buildup in your tubs or sinks and inside your faucets, but this same residue can be deposited onto your skin (pretty gross, I know). Fun fact, this is one of the reasons cosmetic chemists would never use tap water when formulating skincare products—they use either distilled or reverse osmosis water.

How Does Buildup from Minerals Affect Skin? 

The residue deposited on your skin can ultimately create a film that upsets the balance of skin in more ways than one, leading to the following skin issues:

  • Disrupted moisture barrier
  • Dryness and dehydration
  • Irritation and sensitivity
  • Rough-feeling skin
  • Clogged pores

Having a film on the skin disrupts its barrier function because it prevents dry, expired skin cells from being shed so that healthy new skin cells can take their place. It also prevents moisturizers and other products from being properly absorbed. All of this can lead to increased dryness, irritation, and rough-feeling skin. If enough residue builds up, it can even settle inside your pores and create a blockage. 

pH Value

The pH value of tap water can vary a lot depending on where you are. In the U.S., tap water usually has a pH between 4 and 7. For reference, the skin on our face has a pH range between 4.7 and 5. The good news is this doesn’t usually have much of a negative effect on our skin—skin is resilient and really good at balancing itself, so it will learn to adjust to the pH of your tap water.

That said, if you’re traveling or just moved to a new city where the pH of tap water is different from what you’re used to, it can throw your skin for a loop while it adjusts. I had another client a few years back who told me her skin had freaked out while she was traveling in London. It became very rough, textured, and irritated, almost overnight. In Europe, tap water can have a pH as high as 8, so I believe her skin was reacting to this sudden change. A pharmacist confirmed this when she went looking for solutions, and they told her it’s not uncommon for people visiting London to have this experience!

How to Figure Out if Tap Water is Causing Your Skin Problems

I want to preface this by saying that unless you have a condition (such as eczema or rosacea) that results in a genetically compromised barrier, you should be just fine washing your face with tap water. Most people with healthy skin can mitigate its potentially negative effects with a good skincare routine (more on this soon). 

That said, if you strongly suspect your tap water could be causing issues with your skin, the best way to investigate this is to go on a “tap water detox.” Without changing anything else in your routine, try washing your face with distilled water for a week or two to see if your skin improves. The reason I recommend distilled water specifically is that it’s completely devoid of minerals, so it won’t react with the cleansing agents in your face wash to create that residue. The good news is you can usually find it for less than a dollar a gallon at your local grocery store!

How to Prevent Tap Water from Harming Your Skin

Use an Alcohol-Free Toner After Cleansing

My number one tip for removing buildup caused by tap water is to use an alcohol-free toner after cleansing, and this is something I think everyone should be doing. Start by making sure you’ve thoroughly rinsed off your cleanser, then saturate a toning cloth (or cotton round) with a toner for your skin type and gently wipe it across your face and neck. The wiping action will help physically remove residue left behind by your tap water. Having your toning cloth saturated with toner will help it glide across the skin and ensure that it picks up the maximum amount of residue. Additionally, I love using a toner after cleansing because it gives the skin an instant shot of hydration in addition to these other benefits.

Remove Your Cleanser With a Washcloth

Another way to physically remove buildup from your skin is to remove your cleanser with a baby washcloth. I recommend people do this if they’ve been wearing heavy makeup or lots of sunscreen and need to add a little extra oomph to the cleansing process. While using a washcloth is a great way to get your skin clean, it does count as a form of physical exfoliation so I wouldn’t recommend doing it twice a day (once a day could even be too much for some). Just tread carefully and pull back if you start to feel irritation. 

Use Distilled Water to Wash Your Face

Again, I want to reiterate that most people won’t need to do this and that tap water is just fine for the majority of those with healthy skin when you use a toner after cleansing. Using distilled water to wash your face is something I would recommend under two circumstances. The first is that you have an underlying condition that makes your skin sensitive, and you’ve struggled to get that condition under control. (I did have a client I used to work with who started washing her face with distilled water because of her severe eczema, and it definitely helped her to an extent.) The second is that you live somewhere where tap water isn’t safe due to environmental or infrastructure concerns. 

As I mentioned, distilled water is devoid of minerals so it won’t react with the surfactants in your soaps and cleansers. 

Look into Water Softeners or Filters

Finally, you can look into a water softening system or even filters for your showerhead, faucet, etc. These options aren’t always cheap, and individual filters especially can be quite cumbersome, so I wouldn’t recommend investing in either of these unless it’s something you were already considering for other reasons. Also, keep in mind that both of these options will reduce the mineral content of your water but won’t take it down to zero, so while you may see an improvement you’re not totally eliminating the problem.

The Bottom Line

While the minerals found in our tap water aren’t harmful, they can react with the cleansing agents in our soaps and cleansers to essentially create a soap scum residue. Unless properly removed, this residue can build up on our skin causing dryness, irritation, rough skin, and even clogged pores. Most people can mitigate this by properly rinsing after cleansing and then wiping an alcohol-free toner across the face and neck. If you have very sensitive skin caused by a condition such as eczema or rosacea, you may need to take it a step further and try washing your face with distilled water. Since distilled water is devoid of minerals, it won’t leave a residue.

The post Could Tap Water be Causing Your Dryness, Sensitivity, or Clogged Pores? appeared first on Expert Skin Advice from Renee Rouleau.

Read More

10 Skincare Trends Renée Predicts Will Be Everywhere in 2022

At the beginning of each year, I share my predictions for the biggest upcoming trends in skin care. Keep reading to learn what I think will be the top 10 trends of 2022 (and what I think of them!).

1. Products Focused on Barrier Repair

Barrier repair was a trend I predicted would take off in 2021, and this prediction definitely came true. It seems like just a few years ago, not many people were even aware of the concept of the skin’s protective moisture barrier. Now, most people understand that a damaged barrier can contribute to almost every skin concern, from acne to sensitivity. If 2021 was the year of barrier education, this year we’ll see more products that cater to strengthening and repairing your skin’s moisture barrier. 

It’s not that barrier-boosting products didn’t already exist, but I think the marketing will shift so that they’re labeled as such. Most of the ingredients that can help fortify your barrier are oil-based, so barrier-repairing products have traditionally been marketed to people with dry skin types. Anyone’s barrier can be compromised, though, so I think we’ll start to see more nuanced formulas that also cater to those with combination or oily skin types (I’m actually working on a product like this myself, stay tuned!).

2. Sensitive Skin Care

Fragrance-free, allergen-free, essential-oil-free—whatever you call it, we’ve been seeing an increase in products geared toward sensitive skin, and I definitely think this trend will continue to grow. I think it also ties into the trend of barrier repair somewhat. 

For a long time, skin care was all about active ingredients. Everyone was trying to use as many as they could, as often as possible, be it vitamin C, retinol, or exfoliating acids. I definitely think this contributed to a bit of an epidemic of damaged barriers—people were just overdoing it. Now, as I mentioned, people really understand how important it is to have a strong foundation in the form of a healthy barrier. This has led to them seeking out gentler products that nourish the skin.

3. Reusable Skincare Accessories

As companies work to find new ways to be more sustainable and minimize waste, we’ll start seeing more of them put out reusable accessories. Refillable packaging has already been on the rise, but I’m noticing more things like washable “cotton rounds” and reusable face and eye masks. I’m definitely a fan of this and think it’s an innovative category. I’ve never really liked traditional, single-use sheet or eye masks, so I think it’s cool to have reusable ones that enhance the effects of your serums and other skin treatments.

4. Sophisticated Body-Care Routines

Skin care isn’t just for the face! Too often, we neglect the skin on our bodies while caring meticulously for our faces. Over time, this begins to show and things end up looking uneven. I can always tell, for example, when someone hasn’t been extending their skincare routine to their neck and chest. Another part of the body that often gives away someone’s age is the hands, which a lot of us don’t think to protect despite how exposed they are (here’s what I recommend for younger-looking hands). 

This year, we’ll continue to see more sophisticated body care products that use the same ingredients as products you’d use for your face, including exfoliating acids, niacinamide, and hyaluronic acid. Want to know more? Read about my winter body care routine that keeps dry skin at bay. 

5. “Tweakments” (Like Lip Filler)

Minimally invasive cosmetic procedures, such as injectables or threading, have been skyrocketing in popularity, and I don’t see them slowing down any time soon. These treatments, sometimes dubbed “tweakments” since they’re considered less invasive or extreme than traditional cosmetic surgery, are also being sought out by younger and younger audiences. 

Moving forward, I think we’ll continue to see a rise in people getting these procedures to “tweak” certain aspects of their appearance. Of course, no procedure seems to be as popular as lip filler, and this will probably be the case for quite some time. 

I spoke to Dr. Sam Lam, a plastic surgeon in Dallas, to get his take on lip filler (especially people getting it at such a young age).

“Lip fillers are fantastic and problematic at the same time,” says Dr. Lam. “First and foremost, they’re way overdone—everyone is getting lips filled. Lips are typically the last thing I rejuvenate in older patients. I focus more on the eyes, jawline, and lines around the mouth. If you start with lips, even if they’re well-designed, the lips will end up looking younger than the rest of the face.” 

“Younger patients are also getting their lips filled beyond the natural borders,” he added, “but I won’t do this for people. I believe it can quickly become too much. Women think the filler doesn’t stay so they keep on getting their lips filled, but it stays! They have done studies where 8 years later after a single syringe by MRI standards the product is still there. So this can definitely be an issue when someone starts young with lip filler because they end up becoming over-filled.” 

6. Mushroom Ingredients

I work very closely with talented cosmetic chemists in order to formulate products, and they’ve been telling me that some of the most in-demand ingredients right now are mushroom extracts. There are, of course, different types of mushroom extracts, but almost all of them boast impressive anti-inflammatory capabilities. My personal favorite (and the one I formulate with) is silver ear mushroom, also known as Tremella fuciformis. This ingredient has been shown to strengthen the skin’s immune system, soothe irritation, and provide hydration.

7. Skin Supplements

Taking good care of your body and living a healthy lifestyle can undoubtedly improve the overall appearance of your skin. Companies are embracing this philosophy and starting to add skincare supplements to their lines, and I think we’ll see more of this in 2022. Curious whether or not they really work? Read my take on which skincare supplements might actually make a difference

8. Maskne Solutions

Ah, maskne. An issue we’d all hoped would be in our rearview mirrors by now. Unfortunately, the need for masks hasn’t abated, and neither have the skin issues that accompany mask-wearing. In 2022, I think we’ll continue to see innovation in this area as companies try to come up with solutions for this unique concern. We’ve already seen silk masks meant to minimize friction as well as “anti-acne” masks infused with things like copper and silver to repel microbes. On the other hand, some have gone the skin care route with products meant to minimize mask-related acne. I actually launched this Rapid Response Maskne Spray, which uses the same hero ingredients to combat breakouts as the rest of my rapid response collection. I’ve also seen sprays targeting the irritation and inflammation associated with mask-wearing, and I think we can expect to see more products like that this year.

Learn how to manage maskne and irritation caused by face masks.

9. Cleansing Balms

Cleansing balms became very popular when K-beauty first took hold in the U.S., and they seem to be making a resurgence. My hope for this newer generation of cleansing balms is that the formulas become more sophisticated to improve rinsability. Let me explain. Traditional cleansing balms are made up entirely of oils and while oils are great for breaking down makeup and sunscreen, they’re really difficult to rinse off the skin since they repel water. This can leave a film on the skin, which makes it difficult for your other skincare products to penetrate. 

This is why I’m more partial to transforming cleansers that start as a traditional balm consistency but emulsify once you add water. They’re still great for removing makeup and sunscreen while being much easier to rinse off the skin. (Hint: you may see a product like this from my line this year! Sign up for text messages to be the first to receive new product updates.)

10. Essences

Another K-beauty inspired trend, I’m noticing a rise in the popularity of essences (and couldn’t be more thrilled about it!). Essentially, I consider an essence to be a serum-infused toner. I’m a huge proponent of toners thanks to their ability to remove mineral build-up from tap water and instantly hydrate the skin. Infusing a toner with targeted ingredients can give you additional benefits above and beyond just hydration, so it’s a great step to have in your routine. I’ve always considered this toner from my line to be more of an essence, and it’s a fan-favorite thanks to its silky texture and skin-plumping abilities. 

Honorable Mention: Celebrity Skincare Lines

This was a trend I predicted last year, and you can read more about my thoughts on why having a celebrity behind a brand isn’t necessarily a vote of confidence in my eyes. Essentially, celebrities are used as the face of a product line because their looks are aspirational to people, but their looks are never the result of the skincare line they’re promoting. For instance, when Jlo launched her line, I thought, “That’s great, but these products have only existed for a few months and I want to know what she’s been doing for the last 30 years!” Also, keep in mind that it’s almost never just skin care that keeps celebs looking the way they do—there are usually a lot of professional treatments going on behind the scenes as well. All in all, I think celebrity skincare brands are a little misleading. I also think people are starting to feel the fatigue since we saw SO many of them launch this past year, and now that this particular market is so saturated I believe we’ll see a decline in 2022. 

The post 10 Skincare Trends Renée Predicts Will Be Everywhere in 2022 appeared first on Expert Skin Advice from Renee Rouleau.

Read More